Lipreading Practice

Evelyn Glennie contends that deafness is largely misunderstood by the public. She claims to have taught herself to hear with parts of her body other than her ears. In response to inaccurate reporting by the media, Evelyn Glennie published "Hearing Essay" in which she discusses her condition.

Evelyn Glennie

Advice using the exercises

Remember there is no substitute for attending lipreading classes but these sessions could help you to practise lipreading.

Remember we are not using letter names when we practise lipreading; we are using the sounds that the letters make!

Always keep in mind whenever you are lipreading it is important to know the context.

We need to find out what people are talking about!

Before we start I need to tell you how I intend to structure the sessions.

The sessions will be divided into:

  1. Using a video clip to practise the look and shape of the sound
  2. Using a video clip of a short story or article to practise lipreading the sound in context, both from the front and from a profile angle.
  3. Words to practise the lip shape and movement of each sound
  4. Sometimes exercises for you to try if you want to.

When you are watching the sessions, don’t forget you can use the pause key at any time if you want to check or go over anything.

It would be a good idea to practise lipreading without the subtitles switched on and to put the subtitles back on if you want to confirm that you have lipread correctly.

It is also a good idea to turn the volume down or off. This will help you to focus on what you are lipreading.

I shall give you the instructions with my voice and through the subtitles and then sometimes for practice purposes I shall switch off my voice and just give you the lipreading experience.

Using a mirror to look at yourself, when forming the sounds can be useful and working with a partner is useful too.

Sometimes I shall say the sounds or words from the front and to the side.

I hope this will enable you to find, your best position for lipreading and also to practise the other angles.

Remember, to switch the subtitles back on for checking.

Remember too, everybody is different and take from the sessions what is best for you.

So if you are ready, let’s begin.

NB This work could take anywhere between 1year or longer to complete if you were in a lipreading group, so don't feel you have to rush through the work. Take your time and move on when you feel confident.